This program is co-sponsored by the North Carolina Psychological Association and the Schema Therapy Institute Southeast. The North Carolina Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The North Carolina Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program is offered for 40.5 hours of continuing education credit.

 

2019 INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR SCHEMA THERAPY

APPROVED

TRAINING & CERTIFICATION PROGRAM IN INDIVIDUAL SCHEMA THERAPY

November 14 – 16 and December 5 – 7, 2019

 

Joan M. Farrell, PhD and Peregrine M. Kavros, PhD

Hillsborough, NC

The Schema Therapy Institute of the Southeast (STISE) is pleased to announce the 2019 International Society for Schema Therapy approved Training & Certification Program in Individual Schema Therapy.

Schema Therapy is an integrative 3rd wave Cognitive Therapy. The treatment model blends aspects of cognitive behavioral, experiential, attachment, developmental, object relations, psychoanalytic, emotionally focused therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and mindfulness. While treatment goals vary the theoretical approach is designed to ameliorate long standing emotional and behavioral difficulties originating in childhood and adolescence, which impact personality.

Schema Therapy was developed by Dr. Jeffrey Young for clients who did not respond to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. These clients often presented with chronic, rigid and complex psychological issues. The integrated treatment model highlighting experiential techniques, safety, and a conceptualization of the therapeutic relationship, which is supported by evidence-based research, provides a structured framework that facilitates change. 

The training and certification program is composed of two three-day modules that feature both didactic (25.5 hours) and dyadic (15 hours) curricula. Supervision by a Certified ISST Supervisor is arranged after completion of the training program, and pricing is negotiated with each Supervisor. For participants who elect to complete all aspects of the training, the program will lead to either Standard or Advanced Certification through the International Society for Schema Therapy (ISST).

Both applicants who are interested in completing the requirements for official ISST certification, as well as, those applicants who would like advanced level training in Schema Therapy but who are not interested in completing the requirements for certification are invited to apply.

 

 

 

 

Enrollment: Limited to eight (8) clinicians.

The Institute is certified by the International Society for Schema Therapy (ISST) to offer training programs that fulfill ISST’s certification guidelines, and in cooperation with other certified schema therapy training programs throughout the world.

 

By the end of this training and certification program, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe how Schemas may develop over the course of one’s life by listing the five core emotional needs of a child/adolescent. 

  2. Identify and describe the five Schemas composing the 1st Unconditional Domain of Schema Therapy of Disconnection and Rejection by briefly comparing and contrasting a child/adolescent’s experience of love, safety and consistency vs rejection and neglect.  

  3. Identify and describe the four Schemas composing the 2nd Unconditional Domain of Schema Therapy of Impaired Autonomy and Performance by briefly comparing and contrasting a child/adolescent’s experience of autonomy and emotional fluidity vs abandonment and fear.

  4. Identify and describe the two Schemas composing the 3rd Unconditional Domain of Schema Therapy of Impaired Limits by briefly comparing and contrasting a child/adolescent’s experience of over-permissiveness, lack of boundaries vs consistency in modeling realistic limits and expectations in meeting goals, taking responsibility, cooperating, and respecting the rights of others.  

  5. Identify and describe the three Schemas composing the 4th Conditional Domain of Schema Therapy of Other Directedness by briefly comparing and contrasting a child/adolescent’s experience of pleasing others vs healthy expressions of assertiveness and control.

  6. Identify and describe the four Schemas composing the 5th Conditional Domain of Schema Therapy of Over-vigilance and Inhibition by briefly comparing and contrasting two of the four Schemas oriented towards emotional inhibition vs joyful emotional expression.   

  7. Describe how maladaptive Schemas form by illustrating the interaction between the child/adolescent’s innate temperament and early environment and whether the engagement results in frustration or gratification.

  8. Describing the three reactions or coping styles by Illustrating the way in which the nervous system responds to a situation perceived as threatening. 

  9. Illustrate the modification of a maladaptive coping style by describing two interventions used with clients for assessment and activation of Schemas.  

  10. Explain how to administer and present the findings of the YSQ-L3 to clients by completing the inventory themselves, scoring, and describing the findings to a peer within the learning group. 

  11. Explain how to administer and present the findings of the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI 1.1) by completing the inventory themselves, scoring, and describing the findings to a peer within the learning group.

  12. Explain how to administer and present the findings of the Young Parenting Inventory (YPI) by completing the inventory themselves, scoring, and describing the findings to a peer within the learning group.

  13. Demonstrate a Schema dialogue by utilizing a vignette provided by the instructor that counsels a client trying to affect an emotional and/or cognitive shift in one of the client’s relationships or perception of a situation.

  14. Demonstrate a Schema Flash Card by utilizing a vignette provided by the instructor that counsels a client trying to affect an emotional and/or cognitive shift in one of the client’s relationships or perception of a situation.

  15. Demonstrate a Schema Self-Monitoring Form by utilizing a vignette provided by the instructor that counsels a client trying to affect an emotional and/or cognitive shift in one of the client’s relationships or perception of a situation.

  16. Demonstrate Imagery Rescripting by utilizing a vignette provided by the instructor that counsels a client trying to affect an emotional and/or cognitive shift in one of the client’s relationships or perception of a situation.

  17. Demonstrate how letter writing can encourage an emotional shift in a client’s perception by utilizing a vignette provided by the instructor that supports the client’s authentic and possibly inhibited expression of feelings and thoughts about a relationship or situation.

  18. Demonstrate how the use of an affect bridge will assist clients in accessing memories across the developmental age span by utilizing a vignette provided by the instructor that supports and integrates thoughts and feelings influencing a current perception.

  19. Demonstrate two ways that a participant can use to break through emotionally charged therapeutic impasses by modeling a vignette offered by the instructor utilizing two experiential interventions.

  20. Describe the two factors that will assist a client in identifying the presence of a maladaptive (behavioral patterns) mode by noting the variance in experience and expression of affect.

  21. Describe a tool that will assist a client in identifying the activation of a mode cycle and presence of an emotional trigger.

  22. Illustrate two ways in which a client can overcome avoidance of trigger situations by describing the use of a Self-Monitoring Form. 

  23. Describe one of the benefits of empathic confrontation with clients by comparing the outcomes of clients who either avoid or enact conflict.

  24. Demonstrate the use and benefit of a Schema Mode Diary with a client to aid them in the identification of Schema Mode Cycles.

  25. Demonstrate how the Therapeutic Relationship can be used as a conduit for emotional and behavioral change by describing the impact of the client’s emotional, cognitive and behavioral presentation on the therapist.  

  26. Demonstrate how the Therapeutic Relationship can ameliorate the client’s experience of attachment (“Re-Parenting”) by using the Therapist Client relationship as a conduit for emotional and behavioral change.

  27. Describe the necessity of the Therapist’s awareness of their own Schemas in the therapy session by explaining how Schema and Mode activation can undermine the goals of therapy.  

  28. Apply the Schema Therapy Protocol for treating Borderline Personality Disorder by listing two interventions to employ for the activation of one or more Schemas or Modes typical of this presentation.

  29. Apply the Schema Therapy Protocol for treating Narcissistic Personality Disorder by listing two interventions to employ for the activation of one or more Schemas or Modes typical of this presentation.

  30. Apply the Schema Therapy Protocol for treating Antisocial Personality Disorder by listing two interventions to employ for the activation of one or more Schemas or Modes typical of this presentation.

  31. Apply the Schema Therapy Protocol for treating one of the Cluster C Personality Disorders (Avoidant, Dependent, and Obsessive) by listing two interventions to employ for the activation of one or more Schemas or Modes typical of the presentation.

  32. Apply the Schema Therapy Protocol for treating one of the Axis I Disorders (Addiction/Compulsivity, Eating Disorders PTSD, and OCD) by listing two interventions to employ for the activation of one or more Schemas or Modes typical of the presentation.

  33. Summarize how Schema Therapy has been effective in treating Borderline Personality Disorder by demonstrating the impact on the activation of one or more Schemas and Modes.   

  34. Summarize how Schema Therapy has been effective in treating Narcissistic Personality Disorder by demonstrating the impact on the activation of one or more Schemas and Modes.  

  35. Summarize how Schema Therapy has been effective in treating Antisocial Personality Disorder by describing the impact of two interventions on the activation of one or more Schemas and Modes.

  36. Summarize how Schema Therapy has been effective in treating one of the Cluster C Personality Disorders (Avoidant, Dependent, and Obsessive) by describing the impact of two interventions on the activation of one or more Schemas and Modes.

  37. Summarize how Schema Therapy has been effective in treating Axis I Disorders (Addiction/Compulsivity, Eating Disorders, PTSD, and OCD) by describing the impact of two interventions on the activation of one or more Schemas and Modes.

Instructional Level:             

Basic, Intermediate and Advanced

Educational Format:

Lecture, Case Vignettes, Interactive Group Learning, Discussion

INSTRUCTORS

Joan M. Farrell, Ph.D., is Co-director of the Schema Therapy Institute Midwest – Indianapolis Center and Research Director of the Center for Borderline Personality Disorder Treatment and Research, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). She is Adjunct Professor of Psychology at IUPUI and served for 25 years as Clinical Professor in Psychiatry at Indiana University School of Medicine, where she developed and directed an inpatient schema therapy (ST) program for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Dr. Farrell is co-principal investigator of an international study of ST for BPD underway in five countries and was principal investigator of a study of Group ST for BPD, for which she was awarded a National Institute of Mental Health grant. A Certified Schema Therapist Trainer/Supervisor in individual and group ST, she has served as the Coordinator for Training and Certification on the Executive Board of the International Society for Schema Therapy. Dr. Farrell is the codeveloper of group ST and coauthor of three books: Experiencing Schema Therapy from the Inside Out: A Self-Practice/Self-Reflection Workbook for Therapists; The Schema Therapy Clinician’s Guide; and, Group Schema Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder. She has also published numerous research articles in peer reviewed journals, as well as book chapters. Dr. Farrell is a member of the American Psychological Association.

Peregrine M. Kavros, Ph.D., MBA, M.Div., is the Director of the Schema Therapy Institute Southeast, located in Hillsborough, NC where she also maintains a private practice. As a certified Schema Therapist Advanced Trainer/Supervisor, Dr. Kavros is committed to introducing North Carolina therapists to Schema Therapy. She is certified as a Sex Therapist by AASECT (American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists), and an ordained Episcopal Priest. Dr. Kavros is a pastoral associate at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Hillsborough. Her fascination with Schema Therapy evolved out of her private practice in New York City when working with clients challenged by complex psychological and sexual problems, and health concerns. Prior to Dr. Kavros’ move to North Carolina in 2015, she held academic appointments at Columbia University and at the New York University Langone Medical Center. She has published in peer reviewed journals and has authored book chapters. She serves on the Ethics and Conflict Resolution Committee of the International Society of Schema Therapy. Dr. Kavros is a member of the North Carolina Psychological Association.

INFORMATION

TWO THREE DAY MODULES, THURSDAY-SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14th -16th, 2019 AND THURSDAY-SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5th -7th , 2019.

Time: 

Daily Schedule, 8:00 am – 12:15 pm, 12:45 pm-3:45 pm

 

Credit:

6.75 hours Category “A” Continuing Education Credit Daily, 

40.5 hours Category “A” Continuing Education Credit Total

Attendance: Attendance Policy - To receive credit, you must be present for the entire workshop, and you must sign the sign-in/sign-out sheets. No partial credit will be given. No credit will be given for any participant who is more than 15 minutes late at the beginning of any session. No Credit will be given to participants who leave before the close of the session.

 

A letter of attendance, and any requested documentation regarding Continuing Education credits (an additional $10 per letter), will be sent to the participant within 20 days after completion of the course and the course evaluation form.

 

Registration:

                     

$3,000 NCPA Members

$3,250 Psychologists who are not members of NCPA & Clinicians and Therapists representative of Other Professions

A letter documenting Continuing Education Credits is an additional $10.00. 

 

Please complete the application, indicating any special needs. Please either email the application to dr.kavros@peregrinekavrosphd.com or mail to:

 

Peregrine M. Kavros, PhD

Director, Schema Therapy Institute Southeast

1311 Lawrence Road

Hillsborough, NC 27278

Cancellation Policy: 

By November 1, 2019 – No refunds will be issued

By October 11, 2019 – 50% refund

By September 13, 2019 75% refund

 

Cancellations must be presented in writing. Space permitting, and at the Discretion

of the Director, you may have the option to apply unused monies that you have paid

to a future program offered within the next 12-months.

 

Grievance:

Please express all grievances in writing to the attention of Dr. Peregrine Kavros, Schema Therapy Institute of the Southeast. After Dr. Kavros’ responds to the grievance, she will forward the nature of the grievance and the action taken to the North Carolina Psychological Association.

References:

Bamelis, L.L., Evers, S.M., Spinhoven, P., &  Arntz, A. (2014). Results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders. American Journal Psychiatry, March, 171(3), 305-22.

 

Farrell, J.M., & Shaw, I.A. (2018). The conceptual model of schema therapy. In Experiencing Schema Therapy from the Inside Out: A self-practice/self-reflection workbook for therapists (pp.7-32). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

 

Giesen-Bloo, J., van Dyck, R., Spinhoven, P., van Tilburg, W., Dirksen, C., van Asselt, T., …Arntz, A. (2006). Outpatient psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder: Randomized trial of schema-focused therapy vs. transference-focused psychotherapy. Archives of General Psychiatry, 63(6), 649–658.

 

Ten Napel-Schutz, M.C., Abma, T.A., Bamelis, L.L., & Arntz, A. (2017). How to Train Experienced Therapists in a New Method: A Qualitative Study into Therapists' Views. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, January, 24(2), 359-372. Doi:10.1002/cpp.2004. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Younan, R., Farrell, J.M., & May T. (2017) Teaching me to parent myself: The feasibility of an in-patient group schema therapy programme for complex trauma. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, July, 46(4), 463-478. Doi:10.1017/S1352465817000698. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

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